The craft of writing

I have been writing stories ever since I can remember, from the young days as a child and being bilingual meant that I expressed myself very differently. Eventually, English became my dominant language, and I became hooked on writing.

Whether it’s a children’s book or an adult fiction or non-fiction, I approach my writing with the cardinal rule of making my readers ‘feel’ by using words that evoke emotions.

Even the bathroom can be an exciting part of your story. The words you choose convey atmosphere and mood. I feel that when I read descriptions, I have permission to imagine. Film gives you no such option. You are at the mercy of the director.

Here are some words that include sights sounds, smells, tastes, touch when describing the bathroom in a realistic or pragmatic scene. Forget luxury. You would use this type of scenery to connect with the reader and bring the reader into the scene with you.

shaving bristles scattered around the sink
fingerprints on the mirror
dried on toothpaste globs
whirr of the overhead fan
globs of soap dropping to the shower floor
the rasp of a nail file
tapping a toothbrush against the sink
mildew
wet towels
accidentally getting a spray of hairspray or cologne in the mouth
the sluice of water down the back
the cold metal of tweezers or nail clippers
dragging a mascara brush against lashes
the pinch of eyebrow plucking
damp air on the skin
soft towels against the skin
wet hair on shoulders.

Imagine this scene next time you go to an unfamiliar bathroom or rest room.

I opened the door and slapped the fan on. It rattled to life, stirring the hairballs and fluff that littered the floor. Black mildew spotted the tiles and discoloured the sink. Black patches on white. Chunks of something non-descript clung to the walls. I held my breath. The foul air of the bathroom was the deciding factor. I didn’t have to go after all.

This is the first blog in the writing craft series. Stay tuned for the next one coming soon.

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